beaker

  • 1Beaker — may refer to: * Beaker (glassware), a type of laboratory glassware * Beaker (archaeology), a prehistoric vessel * Beaker culture, the archaeological culture often called the Beaker people * Beaker (musician), the Contemporary Christian Music… …

    Wikipedia

  • 2beaker — [bēk′ər] n. [ME biker < ON bikarr, a cup < VL bicarium < ? Gr bikos, vessel with handles] 1. a large or ornate cup; goblet 2. a jarlike container of glass or metal with a lip for pouring, used by chemists, druggists, etc. 3. the contents …

    English World dictionary

  • 3Beaker — Beak er (b[=e]k [ e]r), n. [OE. biker; akin to Icel. bikarr, Sw. b[ a]gare, Dan. baeger, G. becher, It. bicchiere; all fr. LL. bicarium, prob. fr. Gr. bi^kos wine jar, or perh. L. bacar wine vessel. Cf. {Pitcher} a jug.] 1. A large drinking cup,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4beaker — open large mouthed vessel, mid 14c., from O.N. bikarr or M.Du. beker goblet, probably (with O.S. bikeri, O.H.G. behhari, Ger. Becher) from M.L. bicarium, which itself is probably a dim. of Gk. bikos earthenware jug, wine jar (said to be an… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5beaker — ► NOUN Brit. 1) a tall plastic cup. 2) a cylindrical glass container used in laboratories. ORIGIN Old Norse …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6Beaker — Die Muppet Show (The Muppet Show, GB/USA 1976–1981) war eine erfolgreiche Fernsehserie (Puppenspiel/Comedy) mit den Muppets von Jim Henson und Frank Oz. Die Sendung wurde in mehr als 100 Ländern ausgestrahlt. In Deutschland lief die Serie von… …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 7beaker — /bee keuhr/, n. 1. a large drinking cup or glass with a wide mouth. 2. contents of a beaker: consuming a beaker of beer at one gulp. 3. a flat bottomed cylindrical container, usually with a pouring lip, esp. one used in a laboratory. adj. 4. (cap …

    Universalium

  • 8beaker — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ glass, plastic ▪ a glass beaker containing an acid solution VERB + BEAKER ▪ fill, refill ▪ drain …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 9beaker — [[t]bi͟ːkə(r)[/t]] beakers 1) N COUNT A beaker is a plastic cup used for drinking, usually one with no handle. [BRIT] 2) N COUNT A beaker is a large cup or glass. [AM] 3) N COUNT A beaker is a glass or plastic jar which is used in chemistry …

    English dictionary

  • 10beaker — UK [ˈbiːkə(r)] / US [ˈbɪkər] noun [countable] Word forms beaker : singular beaker plural beakers 1) British a plastic cup with straight sides used for drinking 2) science a glass or plastic container with straight sides that is used in a… …

    English dictionary

  • 11beaker — n. 1 a tall drinking vessel, usu. of plastic and tumbler shaped. 2 a lipped cylindrical glass vessel for scientific experiments. 3 archaic or literary a large drinking vessel with a wide mouth. Phrases and idioms: Beaker Folk Archaeol. a people… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12beaker — [14] The immediate source of beaker was Old Norse bikarr. It is widespread in the West Germanic languages (German has becher, for instance), and it seems likely that Old Norse acquired it from Old Saxon bikeri. But it was borrowed into… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 13beaker — beak•er [[t]ˈbi kər[/t]] n. 1) cer a large drinking cup or glass with a wide mouth 2) the contents of a beaker 3) chem. a cuplike container esp. one used in a laboratory • Etymology: 1300–50; alter. of ME biker …

    From formal English to slang

  • 14beaker — /ˈbikə / (say beekuh) noun 1. a large drinking vessel with a wide mouth. 2. the contents of a beaker. 3. a flat bottomed cylindrical vessel usually having a pouring lip, used in laboratories. {Middle English biker, from Old Norse bikarr, from… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 15beaker — cheminė stiklinė statusas T sritis chemija apibrėžtis Laboratorinis indas skysčiams laikyti, šildyti ir reakcijoms atlikti. atitikmenys: angl. beaker rus. химический стакан …

    Chemijos terminų aiškinamasis žodynas

  • 16beaker — [14] The immediate source of beaker was Old Norse bikarr. It is widespread in the West Germanic languages (German has becher, for instance), and it seems likely that Old Norse acquired it from Old Saxon bikeri. But it was borrowed into… …

    Word origins